RSS

Tag Archives: Netduino

Cet MicroWPF is now on CodePlex

After loooooooong time, the Cet MicroWPF repository is publicly available on CodePlex.
The awaited release comes with a (decent) tutorial, where you may follow step-by-step how to create a nice graphical UI for your Netduino. Many more is still to do, but of sure there are enough stuffs to have some fun!

My Snapshot18

Stay tuned!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on May 31, 2014 in .Net, Software

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Micro-JSON for Netduino (and PC)

JSON logoThis is a pretty useful tool for the Netduino, which I need for playing around some Micro-WPF demo on the Eve board.
As soon you want to deal with web-services, JSON is a must-have format for serializing data. Although Netduino does not use Javascript, the JSON format is very compact, at least when compared to XML. By the way, XML is richer as structure and schema, and JSON is sometimes blurry about the data format (e.g. date and time).
The small software library comes with both a parser and a serializer. The parser rules strictly rely on the specification as in the official JSON portal.
The parser deserializes a JSON string to a DOM of specific objects. I’ve been deeply inspired by the JLinq of the awesome library JSON.Net by James Newton-King.

The problem.

Create a JSON parser isn’t a really complex task, unless you have to work on very-low resources devices. In that case, everything should be optimized at best.
My first attempt to create a decent parser and serializer was successful, but the result was not what I’d expected. Although the code runs surprisingly fast on a normal PC, on the Netduino Plus 2 runs pretty slow and takes a lot (i.e. too much) RAM. That leaded me to adjust and optimized several parts of the code, at least to solve the memory occupation issue. The second release is pretty better.

How it works.

The approach is functional-like, although it’s normal C# highly optimized for low-resources platform. However, the same code works on any .Net platform without any problem.
As stated, the first attempt wasn’t the best one. I used several resource-heavy components, which de-facto prohibits the usage on the Netduino. So, it turned to a different yet trivial solution using as less resources as possible. Not sure that’s the very best achievement possible, though.

For instance, here is the piece of code to parse a JSON string, as used in the first release:

        private static JsonParserContext ConsumeString(
            this JsonParserContext ctx,
            bool throws
            )
        {
            var src = ctx.Source;
            JsonParserContext rtn;
            if ((rtn = ctx.ConsumeWhiteSpace().ConsumeAnyChar("\"", throws)).IsSucceeded)
            {
                var sb = new StringBuilder();

                for (int p = src.Position, len = src.Text.Length; p < len; p++)
                {
                    char c;
                    if ((c = src.Text[p]) == '"')
                    {
                        src.Position = p + 1;
                        break;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        sb.Append(c);
                    }
                }

                rtn.SetResult(
                    new JValue { BoxedValue = sb.ToString() }
                    );
            }

            return rtn;
        }

Below is how it is the new improved version. Notice that there’s no more the StringBuilder object, and it avoids the creation of new JsonParserContext instances on every call.

        private static JsonParserContext ConsumeString(
            this JsonParserContext ctx,
            bool throws
            )
        {
            if (ctx.ConsumeWhiteSpace().ConsumeAnyChar("\"", throws).IsSucceeded)
            {
                JSonReader src = ctx.Begin();

                for (int p = src.Position, len = src.Text.Length; p < len; p++)
                {
                    if ((src.Text[p]) == '"')
                    {
                        ctx.SetResult(
                            new JValue { BoxedValue = src.Text.Substring(src.Position, p - src.Position) }
                            );

                        src.Position = p + 1;
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }

            return ctx;
        }

Another great improvement (in terms of resource savings) is about the way to store the key-value pairs in a JSON object.
The first attempt uses the Hashtable object, which comes with any .Net platform, and it’s tailored for such purpose. However, its O(1)-access ability comes with a price in terms of resources, and it’s too high to afford for a Netduino.
The more-trivial solution of a simple array requires much less resources, but the data access now takes O(N).

Performance.

I performed the test with several JSON strings. The longest is about 9kiB, while the shortest is roughly 500 bytes.
Using the first release, the longest string is almost impossible to parse: the parser runs out of RAM very quickly.

Here are some results.
In the following picture there is the complete JSON “roundtrip” (parsing+serializing) of the shortest string (about 500 bytes), using the FIRST release.
The upper plot shows the parsing duration (high level) and takes about 170ms to complete. The serialization of the resulting object is way faster and requires a little more than 20ms (lower plot).

UNIT0000

Hereinafter, the charts are all related to the SECOND library release.
Here is the same 500 bytes-string parsed then serialized. Despite on the PC the revision takes a little longer to perform, on the Netduino is a little faster instead. I suppose all the benefits derive from the less RAM usage.

UNIT0001

Here is a 2kiB-JSON parsed, which takes almost 1.2 seconds to perform. The serialzation is not shown here.

UNIT0003

Finally, the “huge” 9kiB-JSON taking looooong to parse: almost 25 seconds!!!. There’s no serialization in this chart, because after a while the Netduino runs out of RAM. I believe there’s something to trim yet…

UNIT0002

The J-DOM.

I don’t know how to call it. The reference JSON.Net library where I inspired from offers a complete DOM support together with Linq, but that’s not possible in a tiny context as the Micro Framework is. By the way, the DOM I defined is JSON-specific: is the result of the serialization, and allows to manipulate the resulting object with ease. Once the DOM is complete, you can serialize it to have back a JSON string.
As stated, a must-have tool for any web-related application.

The usage is very simple and it’s the same as the JSON.Net’s JLinq (except for the Linq!).
Given this sample JSON string (as from Wikipedia):

{
    "firstName": "John",
    "lastName": "Smith",
    "age": 25,
    "address": {
        "streetAddress": "21 2nd Street",
        "city": "New York",
        "state": "NY",
        "postalCode": 10021
    },
    "phoneNumbers": [
        {
            "type": "home",
            "number": "212 555-1234"
        },
        {
            "type": "fax",
            "number": "646 555-4567"
        }
    ]
}

Here is some example of manipulation from within your C# code:

            var jdom = (JObject)JsonHelpers.Parse(s);

            Console.WriteLine((int)jdom["age"]);    //displays 25

            //add a new phone entry
            var jentry = new JObject();
            jentry["type"] = "mobile";
            jentry["number"] = "+39-123-456-7890";

            var jphones = (JArray)jdom["phoneNumbers"];
            jphones.Add(jentry);

            string jtxt = JsonHelpers.Serialize(jdom);
            Console.WriteLine(jtxt);

Okay, take me to the source code…

Here is the link with two complete Visual Studio solutions: both regular .Net and Netduino MF. The source contains also the first release of the parser, although it is not used.

 
2 Comments

Posted by on March 6, 2014 in .Net, Software

 

Tags: , , ,

Netduino + FT800 Eve = MicroWPF

The spare time is few, but step by step the target is getting closer.
It’s a been I’ve started playing around the FTDI FT800 Eve board, and it must admit it is awesome. If you need a quick solution to add a small touch display to your *duino board, the Eve is something you should consider.

EVE image

You know, I love Netduino and C#. That’s because I chose to play with the display using Netduino (Plus 2), and honestly I’d expected a pretty bad performance. Instead, the graphic engine of the Eve can be easily driven via SPI from any board. That is, the SPI on Netduino is fast, very fast.

My goal is creating a small library for helping many users to create small and funny home/hobby projects with the Netduino and the Eve display boards. Since I love the classic WPF, how could I avoid to inspire from them?

Micro WPF

If you know WPF, many concepts would come easier. Otherwise, I recommend to take a look to the documentation, tutorials and whatever you want. Even if you don’t harm with a PC, rather with the Windows Store/Phone APIs, the approach here isn’t too far from.
The “WPF” term for a simple Netduino is clearly abused. Here is just the visual approach, the XAML-like approach to create the UI, and -yes- the same ability to create your own controls: MeasureOverride and ArrangeOverride.
That’s not all.
If you have any visual application in mind with Netduino+Eve (e.g. a climate control, IoT client, etc), then probably you’d need some kind of navigation service across several pages. That’s the most modern UI experience, on every device: PC, tablets, and phones.

I still don’t write what the library will offer, because it’s just something made for fun: for helping hobbists and even students working with a UI on a such small board as Netduino is.
For sure, there are NOT (nor in the future):

  • data binding
  • XAML parsing (the tree has to be created programmatically)
  • styling
  • the remaining 99.99% of regular WPF…

An example of layout

The most versatile yet complex layout control is the Grid, but it seems working fine.
Let’s take this sample XAML:

<Page x:Class="WpfApplication2.Page1"
      xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
      xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
      xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
      xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
      mc:Ignorable="d" 
      d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="300"
	Title="Page1">

    <Grid>
        <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <ColumnDefinition Width="150" />
            <ColumnDefinition Width="*" />
            <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto" />
        </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="*" />
            <RowDefinition Height="2*" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>

        <StackPanel
            Grid.Row="0"
            Grid.Column="0"
            x:Name="R0C0"
            Background="Blue"
            />

        <StackPanel
            Grid.Row="0"
            Grid.Column="1"
            x:Name="R0C1"
            Background="DarkGreen"
            />

        <StackPanel
            Grid.Row="0"
            Grid.Column="2"
            x:Name="R0C2"
            Background="Red"
            >
            <Button
                Content="Caption"
                Width="120"
                Height="30"
                Margin="10,5"
                HorizontalAlignment="Center"
                x:Name="B0"
                />
        </StackPanel>


        <StackPanel
            Grid.Row="1"
            Grid.Column="0"
            Grid.ColumnSpan="2"
            x:Name="R1C0"
            Background="LightPink"
            />


        <StackPanel
            Grid.Row="2"
            Grid.Column="1"
            Grid.ColumnSpan="2"
            x:Name="R2C1"
            Background="MediumSlateBlue"
            >
            <Button
                Content="Caption"
                Width="120"
                Height="30"
                Margin="10,5"
                HorizontalAlignment="Center"
                x:Name="B2"
                />
        </StackPanel>

    </Grid>
</Page>

On the regular WPF the result is the following:

sample-wpf

Now, let’s see how to write the same thing on Netduino:

    public class DemoPage2 : PageBase
    {
        protected override void OnCreate(FT800Device dc)
        {
            var btn_prev = new WidgetButton() { Margin = new Thickness(10, 5), Text = "Prev" };
            btn_prev.Click += new EventHandler(btn_prev_Click);

            var btn_next = new WidgetButton() { Margin = new Thickness(10, 5), Text = "Next" };
            btn_next.Click += new EventHandler(btn_next_Click);
            btn_next.HAlign = HorizontalAlignment.Center;

            var grid = new WidgetGridContainer();
            grid.Name = "GRID";

            grid.AddColumnDefinition(150);
            grid.AddColumnDefinition(1, GridUnitType.Star);
            grid.AddColumnDefinition(1, GridUnitType.Auto);

            grid.AddRowDefinition(1, GridUnitType.Star);
            grid.AddRowDefinition(2, GridUnitType.Star);
            grid.AddRowDefinition(1, GridUnitType.Auto);

            {
                var ctr = new WidgetStackContainer();
                ctr.Name = "R0C0";
                ctr.Background = Colors.Blue;
                grid.SetRowCol(ctr, 0, 0);
                grid.Children.Add(ctr);

                ctr.Children.Add(btn_prev);
            }
            {
                var ctr = new WidgetStackContainer();
                ctr.Name = "R0C1";
                ctr.Background = Colors.DarkGreen;
                grid.SetRowCol(ctr, 0, 1);
                grid.Children.Add(ctr);
            }
            {
                var ctr = new WidgetStackContainer();
                ctr.Name = "R0C2";
                ctr.Background = Colors.Red;
                grid.SetRowCol(ctr, 0, 2);
                grid.Children.Add(ctr);

                ctr.Children.Add(
                    new WidgetButton() { Name = "B0", Margin = new Thickness(10, 5) }
                    );
            }
            {
                var ctr = new WidgetStackContainer();
                ctr.Name = "R1C0";
                ctr.Background = Colors.LightPink;
                grid.SetRowCol(ctr, 1, 0, 1, 2);
                grid.Children.Add(ctr);
            }
            {
                var ctr = new WidgetStackContainer();
                ctr.Name = "R2C1";
                ctr.Background = Colors.MediumSlateBlue;
                grid.SetRowCol(ctr, 2, 1, 1, 2);
                grid.Children.Add(ctr);

                ctr.Children.Add(btn_next);
            }

            this.Content = grid;
        }

        void btn_prev_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            NavigationService.Instance.GoBack();
        }

        void btn_next_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            NavigationService.Instance.Navigate(new DemoPage3());
        }
    }

That leads the following snapshot:

My Snapshot5

NOTE: by live the display shows the colors correctly. However, the picture taken renders a bad result.

Widgets, widgets, widgets…

The Eve board is very well designed, because it’s plenty of useful widgets. I don’t believe you’d need something different from the provided.
At the moment of writing, the Netduino library supports:

  • (normal) Button
  • ToggleButton
  • TextBlock
  • Slider
  • Dial

and, as for the layout control:

  • StackPanel
  • Grid

As long the spare time helps me, I will try to add some other useful component as the TextBox and the Image.

Yet some screens generated by the Netduino and the FT800 Eve board.
WP_000595

My Snapshot4

My Snapshot3

My Snapshot7

Source code

I will release a beta release soon.

 
4 Comments

Posted by on February 16, 2014 in .Net, Electronics, Software

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Microsoft TechDays 2013 Paris: une grand merci!

The greatest Microsoft event of Europe has just been closed in Paris, France.
I am soooo honored to have been mentioned in the “Geek in da House” session of Laurent Ellerbach.

Image00001

He presented two very interesting projects, both of them involving Netduino and a little hardware around.
In the first part of his session, Laurent presents his remotely controlled gardening sprinkler system. Afterward, his Netduino is used in a totally different way: as transmitter for IR commands against a Lego train. My help was just on the latter project.
Here is the link of the video (French speaking).
Have fun!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 17, 2013 in .Net, Electronics, Software

 

Tags: , , , , ,

A playable Invaders-like game with a Netduino Plus 2

Finally here is my last article of the series about the GDI library for Netduino and how to use it.
The post guides you on how to create your own game, such an Invaders-like playable game.

WP_000337

WP_000321
Enjoy!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 17, 2013 in .Net, Electronics, Software

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The GDI library for Netduino targets a LCD module

This time the article will show you how to use the GDI library for Netduino for driving a very common LCD character module.

Enjoy!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 16, 2013 in .Net, Electronics, Software

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Animation with the GDI library for Netduino

This is my third article about the GDI library for Netduino.
This time the discussion is on how to create a simple animation for the Sure Electronics led-matrix.
Enjoy!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on February 14, 2013 in .Net, Electronics, Software

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 88 other followers